Archive for Al Peasland

Al Peasland Podcast Interview

Posted in Martial Arts and Training with tags on January 2, 2013 by ctkwingchun

http://richardbarnes.com/real-life-real-people-with-alan-peasland

Very happy to have had Al on our blog.

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Merry Christmas from CSP

Posted in Uncategorized with tags on December 4, 2010 by ctkwingchun

(Spot the guest author)

Peace, CTK

Hard Work Rears Its Ugly Head (Again)

Posted in Uncategorized with tags on October 28, 2010 by ctkwingchun

I was recently hanging out at Al Peasland’s Blog listening to a Round Table discussion between some high-level martial artists: http://al-peasland.blogspot.com/2010/10/crossing-pond-podcast-111.html

It was recorded during the Crossing The Pond X-Po that happened recently.

A topic came up questioning (the perhaps lack of) respect, discipline and hard work in the martial arts.  I, again, was reminded that the only way to excel at anything in life is putting in hard work – and pushing past a ‘pain point’ in order to achieve some result.

Give it a listen!  Three out of the 11 parts have been posted and there’s some good ideas as to how things have changed (or not) over the years.

Peace, CTK

Translating Sports to the Street by Al Peasland (Part 2/3)

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on July 21, 2010 by ctkwingchun

(L to R) Al Peasland and Geoff Thompson

What doesn’t work

The real issue here is the environment and approach to competition combat as opposed to real-life combat.

Things which make competition training less effective or directly transferable to the street would be:-

The presence of a referee – someone ready to jump in if you are taking a beating

The strict control that most competitions are based on a 1 on 1 format – meaning you are never outnumbered (even if sometimes it may feel like it) and there is never the threat of others jumping in and adding to the melee

There are always rules – no matter how open these are, there are always rules. Even if it is a time limit, a limit on areas to strike or the strikes you can use, the clothing you can wear, the protective equipment you must wear, even if that is just a gumshield, the environment in which you are fighting, etc etc

Even if the rules are very limited, the presence of rules changes the mindset of the fighter and adds an element of familiarity which brings with it an element of comfort.

Few fights in any art are over in one or two seconds. Partly this is because fighters are often well matched but also the format of the fight, the way it is judged and scored, means you are often focussing on wearing down your opponent, hurting them with a view to slowing them down rather than trying to get the fight finished with the first shot or in the first couple of seconds.

Most competition arts do not cover the skills of pre-fight dialogue, body language, the warning signs of impending confrontation and the opportunity for fights to start when you are not fully aware or ready for action.

Even MMA and Cage Fighting, which is considered the most complete and all-round fighting system, does not fit with a conventional street-based fight. It is a match fight, akin to meeting your adversary at a location of your agreed choosing in order to settle your differences. These are very rare for the vast majority of us and so, whilst it has great skill in all of the ranges, still lacks elements that would make it more effective in the pavement arena.

Most arts only teach to defend against attacks contained within their art. Whilst I am not a huge fan of blocking and defending in confrontation anyway, it’s still a valuable asset to have an appreciation for all ranges and all types of attacks – not just those found in the one art that you train.

When we get into point scoring arts, where anything more than a bloody nose is considered poor control and warrants a warning, then we start to move away from effective street based training.

We start to develop muscle memory that goes against the intention of hitting to destroy and knock out opponents. And we all know that we get what we train for , so if I spend the vast majority of my time learning to snap techniques and retract them at the point of contact, then this is what I will do in the heat of the moment in a street confrontation.

At this point, I want to make it clear that I am not criticising any arts nor dismissing anything for the street, but under the theme of this article, what I wanted to do was simply highlight what I feel can translate directly from sports based arts to a street based environment.

With 25 years of Reality Based martial arts training and as Geoff Thompson’s longest serving student in the Real Combat System, Al Peasland has brought together effective techniques from a wide range of arts and blended them into one self-protection system.  Al is fully qualified to offer certified training in a blended style containing many of the most effective techniques from Boxing, Karate, Muay Thai, Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Sambo Russian wrestling, Judo and many others.

Translating Sports to the Street by Al Peasland (Part 1/3)

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on July 20, 2010 by ctkwingchun

Al Peasland - Pre-emptive Strike

The theme for this article was to consider how we can relate sports based martial arts such as Western Boxing, Wrestling or Karate, to a street based environment.

For me, it would be quite easy to say, “they are worlds apart with a gaping chasm between what works on the mat of competition and what works outside”.

However, the real story may be a little more complicated and nowhere near as cut and dried as that.

What works

Firstly, lets look at what arts and what aspects of arts have the best chance of translating directly to the street.

I have always been a firm believer, partly through realistic training and partly through binary testing on the street, that the punching arts, in particular Western Boxing, have the most success and best direct application to real-life encounters.

It’s said that 90% of fights end up on the floor – but I would argue that almost 100% start standing up – and if your hands are good, and you understand the language of street fighting, then it’s solid knock-out shots that should be your first port of call.

Training in Boxing will give you the best education in learning fast, effective, accurate, explosive and technically proficient punching skills.

Once in-grained, these can work perfectly well either in the ring or outside.

Other arts which I would favour from a sporting arena in terms of their street based effectivity would be Judo, or grappling arts which have a good stand-up game, and also any of the kicking arts which focus more on power than snappy flashy kicks, such as Shotokan Karate or Muay Thai.

Whilst kicking range can seem safer and more comfortable for a confrontation on the street, mainly because of the extra distance you are from your opponent, in reality, this distance rarely lasts more than a fleeting second or two – so to maintain a good kicking range in order to fight with kicks, is a really difficult task.

The grappling arts however have a very valid place, and the stand-up game from Judo is perfect for when fights crash together into a clinch, giving you options for taking control of the grapple and possibly ending with a heavy throw, before you have to consider the ground-game.

Getting used to getting hit. If you art includes full contact and heavy blows are allowed, this is great conditioning for helping you become desensitised to the shock element that occurs when you are injured or hurt during a confrontation.

Obviously, there are a myriad of other arts, all of which have techniques that are applicable to the street. The trick is being able to recognise those and then figure out how they can be modified in order to make them work in this different arena.

With 25 years of Reality Based martial arts training and as Geoff Thompson’s longest serving student in the Real Combat System, Al Peasland has brought together effective techniques from a wide range of arts and blended them into one self-protection system.  Al is fully qualified to offer certified training in a blended style containing many of the most effective techniques from Boxing, Karate, Muay Thai, Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Sambo Russian wrestling, Judo and many others.

Al Peasland – KISS

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on July 14, 2010 by ctkwingchun

http://al-peasland.blogspot.com/2010/07/keep-it-simple.html

KISS=Keep It Simple, Stupid

or as my Sifu has once said – KISK=Keep It Simple, Kenton

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